A Family Update–Albeit, Not a Positive Post

It’s true I have dreaded writing an update on the blog.  So much has happened since our last post–and yet, I feel my heart is a little heavy.  Maybe it’s like that because I am not going home this summer–not for a visit, and not to move (as we had originally planned…)  Maybe it’s because it’s the end of the school year, and I always get a little stressed at the end of the school year.  Maybe it’s just life–a little good, a little bad, a little happy, and a little sad.

For whatever reason, I haven’t felt the need to write here.

Victor went in early May for his visa appointment.  It was scheduled for July, but we were able to change it in April when the calendar was updated in Ciudad Juarez.  He stayed with some of our friends, which was nice.  He was there for a week, which wasn’t too nice.  Everything went well for his appointments, and he received his denial on the last day.  That’s really what we were waiting for–the denial.

With Victor’s denial, we can submit his waivers.  As soon as we can get together the money, we will send those in.  Each waiver costs nearly $1,000–and the last appointment to Ciudad Juarez cost around $1,300.  That brings our total cost to over $2,000 so far.  This is without the aide of a lawyer which would, of course, cost more.

It isn’t that I am not glad I am here in Torreon another year…I am.  It’s just that things aren’t exactly super stable right now.  Between school, tutoring, Victor’s changing schedule, and the regular housework, life is nutty.  We also have the workers staying with us regularly, and this changes our schedule a bit.  (In Mexico, they eat lunch at around 2 and supper around 8.  Needless to say, that puts us in bed later–and creates pretty grumpy nights around here.)

Ale is finishing her second year of school, and will start kindergarten in August.  Jojo will also start school with us–something we are all looking forward to.  She asks if she can go to school almost daily, and has even gotten out of the car to go in a couple times.  It will also be nice to have our schedules more of the same.

Annnndddd… good things are happening at work too.  FINALLY, Responsive Classroom will be coming to train teachers.  I’ve been asking for this for a while.  Additionally, some other things that I am pretty proud of.

I guess I just feel really nervous.  We know we have some big year coming our way–and I don’t feel too positive at the moment.  That isn’t something I am really used to.  Every day it seems like something else is in the new about immigrants and the way they are being treated.  Families are being split up at our border and families are being split BY our border.  The hardest thing is that I suspect it will be our family next year split–due to the processing time and the money associated with the waivers.

So, speaking of immigrants and their struggle for a better life: the minimum wage is about $4.30 USD a day.  Not factoring in the cost of food, housing, water, school, clothes, or other necessities in life, it would take a year and a half of working six days a week saving EVERY peso you make to get as far as we have at this point.  Of course, if you think the immigrants should be able to eat, have money for transportation to work (bus fare), send their kids to school, pay for water and electricity, or have clean drinking water you might be able to see the problem that many immigrants face.

Immigration Costs (in USD): $830 + Medical appointment, visa appointment, translations, travel, other costs for a week in Juarez $1,300= $2,130 total

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